Top 50 Most Famous Light Novel Authors

Manga is arguably one of Japan’s most significant cultural gifts to the entire globe. This intriguing phenomenon stretches back to the 11th century when satirical paintings of animals known as ukiyo-e were popular in Japan. However, it was not until about 1790 that manga began to take the first steps toward becoming the remarkable phenomenon that it is today. It was due to the entrance of Westerners into the nation, who were captivated by the beauty of ukiyo-e. Eventually, the manga began to be developed with subjects never seen before in other areas of the globe and with a graphic elegance that distinguished it. Of course, none of this would have been possible without the existence of the most incredible manga artists, and that is why here we bring you a list of the best exponents of this art. First, on our list, we have

Eiichiro Oda

Eiichiro Oda is one of today’s most recognized manga artists since he is the creator of “One Piece” and is the best-selling manga. He even set a Guinness World Record by selling over 400 million copies. His career in this field began at the age of 17 when he submitted his work to a cowboy-themed manga called “Wanted.” However, he had said from a young age that he wished to devote himself to manga when he grew up. One Piece’s success has been so well-known that it has even spawned a long-running anime series. There are additional products linked to his most successful comics, such as several artbooks and official manuals, video games, and even a card game.

Osamu Tezuka

Osamu Tezuka is undoubtedly the most influential and prominent manga artist in the world of modern manga, with many dubbing him “The God of Manga.” This new method of producing manga enabled the production of far more intricate storylines, complicated plots, and greater lengths than their predecessors. To this day, manga artists draw inspiration from his style while creating new works. Among his most well-known manga is “Ribbon No Kishi,” widely regarded as the first shojo in history. Another successful manga was “Tetsuwan Atom.” Throughout his life, he created approximately 700 manga that ultimately changed the course of history.

Akira Toriyama

It is difficult to discuss manga without mentioning one of the most popular series: Dragon Ball. Its creator, Akira Toriyama, is widely regarded as one of the most influential manga artists of all time. His works have encouraged many to begin in this field because he is the creator of Dragon Ball, but his rise to popularity was provided by Dr. Slump, which was his first huge success and was released in the early 1980s. In the case of Dragon Ball, the saga was converted to anime, as well as Live Action, video games, and even Cross Epoch. He did this in conjunction with Eiichiro Oda, the creator of One Piece, where both mangas were merged into a single story not related to the original works’ plot threads.

Ryūhei Tamura

Ryhei Tamura, born April 19, 1980, in Gifu Prefecture, is a Japanese manga artist known for his work on the Beelzebub manga and anime series. Ryhei Tamura, a mangaka from tsu in Shiga Prefecture, was a former assistant to Toshiaki Iwashiro, the creator and author of the manga series PSYREN. He is a buddy of Magico inventor Naoki Iwamoto.

Hiromu Arakawa

From a mangaka who took the shounen genre and turned it into an empowering female narrative to one who created one of the most famous shounen manga of all time. Hokkaido-born Hiromu Arakawa (pen name of Hiromi Arakawa) is the creator of FullMetal Alchemist. The second anime adaptation of FullMetal Alchemist, known as Brotherhood, is widely regarded as one of the giants of anime, and it faithfully adapted the incredible manga originally written and drawn by Arakawa. Beginning her manga career after moving to Tokyo in 1999, Arakawa is now a giant of the industry, and FullMetal Alchemist will go down in history as one of the manga and anime world’s finest creations: a series of deep history and lore, exciting magic systems, and broad, engrossing character arcs. Arakawa’s characters defy genre tropes and represent something genuinely unique in the world of manga and anime.

Hirohiko Araki

Hirohiko Araki is well-known for his work on the manga “JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure.” There were no items discovered. This work was introduced to the public in 1987 and has remained active since, with 127 compilation volumes to date, making it the second-longest-running manga. The artist’s style is characterized by highly inked lines and broad postures in hyper-masculinized figures. This has given his paintings a distinct visual look that has been highly welcomed by a national and worldwide audience.

Masashi Kishimoto

Few mangas have reached the level of success that Naruto has. Masahi Kishimoto, a prominent manga artist who has been recognized as an artist since 1995, is the mastermind behind this masterpiece. He published the first issue of Naruto in 1997, but it wasn’t until 1999 that the manga was expanded to a weekly frequency. This manga was adapted into an anime, which became a worldwide cult sensation. Due to the work’s tremendous influence on the audience and popularity, films, video games, art books, card games, and sequels have been made.

Junji Ito

Many believe Junji Ito to be the greatest maestro of fear. This Manga artist’s works are primarily in the horror category, where he has distinguished himself by producing unsettling stories that rapidly become addicting. Blood, individuals who mysteriously begin to behave irrationally, horror, deep-sea creatures, the rupture and dissolution of civilization, and, of course, death stand out as aspects that can be found regularly within his works. Uzumaki and Tomie are two of his most well-known works. One of his most major financial triumphs is the latter since it has spawned films and an anime version.

Go, Nagai

Go Nagai is a pioneer in the field of manga. Many believe him to be the father of the Super Robot genre. It’s not for nothing that Mazinger Z’s work marked a before and after in the world of manga, achieving international recognition and influencing millions of young people with his stories. He has, however, not only made Robots Manga but has also successfully gone into other genres such as Magical Girl with his work “Cutie Honey.” He has dabbled with the action and romance genres with “Devilman.” He developed a popular ecchi named “Harenchi Gakuen,” a genre he also pioneered with this work.

Yellow Tanabe

Yellow Tanabe is a manga artist from Japan. She worked as an assistant for Mitsuru Adachi and Makoto Raiku before making her debut with the short tale Lost Princess in 2002. Her most well-known work is the manga series Kekkaishi, which has been turned into an anime television series and translated into several languages. In May, she wrote a one-shot piece in the first edition of the relaunch of Monthly Shonen Sunday.

Naoki Urasawa

Naoki Urasawa is without a doubt, one of today’s most current, vital, and influential Manga Artists. He is renowned as the “master of suspense” and has received several accolades for the quality and complexity of his works. Among his most well-known comics, “Monster” stands out, further developing his unique style. Similarly, they have grown highly famous, even converting to anime in certain cases, such as “20th Century Boys” and “Yawara!”His drawings are often very realistic, verging on realism, and he produces figures that are clearly and immediately recognized. Because of his tremendous talent and the difficulty in matching the level of his works, Urasawa is regarded as one of the most significant references for young artists.

Takeshi Obata

Can you picture possessing a notepad with the ability to take someone’s life simply by writing their name? That was Takeshi Obata’s thinking when he created his well-known masterpiece, “Death Note.” This Manga Artist decided to devote himself to this art since he has always enjoyed drawing, and he began his professional career in 1985. In 1998, he scored his first huge success with “Hikaru No Go.” Despite the tremendous uproar it sparked, he eventually produced “Death Note,” which became a big cult sensation. This manga has just become one of Japan’s best-sellers. This manga has been adapted into anime, movies, video games, and even a Netflix live-action series. This manga has just become one of the best-sellers in Japan. This manga has been adapted into anime, movies, video games, and even a Netflix Live-Action series.

Rumiko Takahashi

While painting Mangas, this Manga Artist was studying science at university. She had a fantastic career and a lot of success, earning her the moniker “The Queen of Manga.” In fact, in 1978, she became the first female manga artist to sell over a million copies. Among her most important works are “Ranma 1/2”, “Yatsura,” and “InuYasha.” In the case of InuYasha, it was adapted to anime and video games because it is very popular. This manga has won awards inside and outside the Japanese territory.

Katsuhiro Otomo

Katsuhiro witnessed all of Japan’s protests in the 1970s personally, and he became a fan of manga from that era, such as “Astro Boy” and “Gigantor,” among others. These events had a huge impact on his development as a Manga Artist, a career he has committed himself to since 1973. He has written a lot of manga, and his first big hit was “Domu,” which garnered him an award. However, one of his most well-known works is Akira, in which he spent eight years developing a wonderful tale that helped him establish himself globally. 

Toshie Kihara

While Riyoko Ikeda popularised the yuri genre of shoujo manga, Toshie Kihara – also a member of The 24 Group – was a popular manga artist in the BL (boys’ love) genre, creating popular historical BL manga like Mari to Shingo. Kihara became known for focusing on historical fiction, often setting her manga in a Japanese historical backdrop, and giving them a romantic twist. She is another example of how The 24 Group shaped and changed the manga landscape, especially in the realm of shoujo manga.

Naoko Takeuchi

Naoko Takeuchi is a pharmaceutical scientist who has made a career as a manga artist. She began her work without any prior illustrating schooling, but this has not been an issue because she has amazing natural talent. Her most well-known works are “Codename Wa Sailor V” and “Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon.” The latter was released to the public in 1992 and was published in 18 volumes until 1997. After selling 300,000 copies in Japan at the time, it became one of the most popular comics until it was adapted into an anime series.

Machiko Hasegawa

Machiko Hasegawa, one of Japan’s first female manga artists, died in 1992 at the age of 72, yet she remains a significant figure in the manga business. Her most famous work was a comic strip that lasted over 30 years, from the 1940s through her retirement in the 1970s. Sazae-san, Hasegawa’s popular comic strip, appeared in the popular Asahi Shinbun and caught the zeitgeist of post-war Japanese family life, with a little girl representing the modern-day lady leaving Japanese tradition behind and turning to the future. The figure was a feminist icon, and Hasegawa herself evolved into a renowned feminist throughout her life.

Takehiko Inoue

Before committing to manga, Takehiko committed himself to basketball, which provided the idea for the core topic of his most important work, “Slam Dunk.” Until the introduction of “One Piece,” this manga was considered the best-selling in history. Takehiko released 31 Slam Dunk volumes, and his success spread to anime, films, and video games. He is presently working on “Real,” a film about wheelchair basketball. In Japan alone, this manga has sold up to 14 million copies. Until the advent of “One Piece,” this manga was the best-selling in history. Takehiko released 31 Slam Dunk volumes, and his success spread to anime, movies, and video games. He is presently working on the film “Real,” which is about wheelchair basketball. This comic has sold up to 14 million copies in Japan alone.

Yusuke Murata

At the age of 12, Murata won a Mega Man villain design contest twice. Nonetheless, it wasn’t until 1995 that he made his debut as a Manga Artist. Over time, he began to get significant recognition for his work. By 2002, he was working on the illustration for “Eyeshield 21,” a 333-chapter manga later adapted into an anime. Similarly, since 2009, he has been working on the illustration for One-Punch Man, which has become an international sensation, selling millions of copies since its debut.

Tite Kubo

Kubo’s journey may have been one of failure; nevertheless, a fortunate turn of events allowed this artist to attain international recognition. In 1999, he published his first manga, “Zombie Powder,” but it had to be terminated after just four volumes because it was not popular, and its material was too violent for the public. Later, in 2002, he began releasing “Bleach,” although it had a mixed response from the audience at first. This disheartened the artist, and he assumed that his second project would be canceled as well. Still, the author of “Dragon Ball,” Akira Toriyama, actually sent him a letter encouraging him to continue. Fortunately, this gesture inspired Kubo, and the rest is history, as “Bleach” is now one of the most successful Manga works globally.

Yoshihiro Togashi

He began drawing manga as a youngster in a very informal manner. In 1986, he made his debut as a manga artist with the publication of “Buttobi Straight,” He received a minor prize. He gained prominence with the publication of “Yu Yu Hakusho” in the 1990s. Togashi takes a creative sabbatical after finishing this comic and selling almost 50 million copies in Japan alone because he is weary. He later emerges with several intriguing short story pieces. However, in 1998, he produced “Hunter X Hunter,” which earned international recognition due to its tremendous popularity.

Kentaro Miura

Miura got an early start as an artist since he created his first manga for school when he was ten years old, which included 40 volumes and was titled “Miuranger.” A few years later, he began to employ better drawing methods, which improved the quality of his works until he received his first professional publication in 1982. By 1988, he had completed his most major work, “Berserk Prototype,” which was adapted into a manga called “Berserk” for 1989 and is still being published today. Although his career was first modestly successful, his reputation developed to help him become one of the best Manga artists today.

Riyoko Ikeda

Born in Osaka and a member of The 24 Group, Riyoko Ikeda is best known for her popular ‘70s shoujo manga, a series of historical fiction about Marie Antoinette called The Rose of Versaille. The Rose of Versaille received a 40-episode anime adaptation, as well as a feature-length animated film adaptation. It was an early start of the yuri (girls’ love) genre, and it was even revitalized in 2013 for another 5 years, before finishing once again in 2018.

Hajime Isayama

It is possible to be successful almost on the first try, as was the case with Isayama. This artist published the first chapter of “Shingeki no Kyojin” in 2006. Although he received some negative reviews for the quality of his drawings, he still kept trying. Just three years later, in 2009, Hajime received an award for that same manga, now with better graphics. It is currently one of the best-selling Manga Worldwide. Its cultural impact has been so significant that it has been adapted into video games, visual novels, Anime, Live-Action movies, and more.

Akihito Tsukushi

This artist has been creating Manga since the late 1970s. He is most recognized for his work as the original character designer of “Otogi-Jushi Akazukin,” He demonstrates exceptional creativity. But that’s not all. He is also the famous Manga “Made in Abyss,” which has a very successful anime version.

Fumiyo Kono

Fumiyo Kono’s In This Corner of the World is a famous, award-winning modern manga series. Her other popular series, Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms, was launched in 2004. Kono’s popular manga series are both situated in and around Hiroshima, where she grew up. The narrative of a young lady living in Kure, a naval town just outside Hiroshima, under the shadow of World War II, is told in This Corner of the World, which was recently turned into an anime film. The narrative delves into Japanese civilian life in the area during the devastating times of war. Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms, adapted into both a novel and a live-action film, tells two different stories. The first is set ten years after the bombing of Hiroshima and follows a family living in post-war 1950s Japan. The second story follows the next generation of that family, living in 1980s Tokyo.

Moto Hagio

If you are a lover of the shōnen ai genre, you should know that Moto Hagio is one of these stories’ pioneers. However, this artist has been involved with many other themes, such as science fiction and even romance. One of his most popular creations has been Pō no Ichizoku, Thomas no Shinzō, and, of course, Zankoku Na Kami Ga Shihai Suru, which is one of the most recent and deals with quite sensitive topics, such as child abuse by his father, and homosexuality. Mato’s legacy has been so positive that she has received multiple awards for her writing innovation for younger girls.

Hiroyuki Takei

Hiroyuki Takei, 48, is a manga illustrator who began his career in 1997. At the period, he distinguished himself by incorporating details from mythology and the occult in his writings. A year later, he published Shaman King, one of his greatest and most well-known works, which sold over sixteen million copies worldwide and was published in 32 volumes. This artist has also distinguished himself as a scriptwriter, as seen by “Ultimo,” a manga series published by the well-known Japanese magazine Jump Square.

Natsuki Takaya

Natsuki Takaya, a mangaka from Tokyo, is best known for her classic manga series Fruits Basket. This is a shoujo manga that has gained cult status in the West. It was made into a good anime series in 2001 but was recently re-adapted into a more aesthetically spectacular and ambitious anime remake in 2019. Fruits Basket is a beloved shoujo manga that follows the life of Toru Honda, an optimistic young woman who stays strong in the face of adversity. When Toru ends up living in the home of the Soma family, she soon discovers that this family hides a magical curse related to the animals of the Chinese zodiac. From here, hijinks ensue and the story balances well between comedy and tragedy.

Ichigo Takano

Born in Nagano and still very young for a manga artist of her renown and caliber, Ichigo Takano is the creator of Orange. This popular six-volume manga series was adapted into a 13-episode anime series just before the manga wrapped. You can check out the complete collection here. Orange is one of Japan’s most famous and adored shoujo manga. Its story follows a high school girl named Naho Takamiya who receives a letter from her almost-thirty-year-old self. The letter tells her about a new student joining her school: a boy tied to what the letter claims are her biggest regret. Orange (especially Takano’s original manga) was a colossal hit amongst high school and university students across Japan and remained a huge cultural moment. This manga alone has cemented the young Ichigo Takano into the pantheon of the best Japanese manga artists.

Clamp 

CLAMP is the moniker selected by a group of outstanding female manga artists and authors during the height of their success in the 1990s. They began in the 1980s with eleven members but quickly shrank to four. And it was the four of them – Nanase Okawa, Mokona Apapa, Tsubaki Nekoi, and Satsuki Igarashi – that gave us such classic comics as Tokyo Babylon, Cardcaptor Sakura, and Chobits. It was Cardcaptor Sakura that raised CLAMP to legendary status. Alongside her contemporary Sailor Moon, Cardcaptor Sakura is responsible for the dizzying popularity of the magical girl genre of shoujo manga; a genre that remains popular and beloved.

Kore Yamazaki

Kore Yamazaki is yet another up-and-coming manga artist in Japan. She was born in Hokkaido in 1990 and has developed a series that has generated a lot of talk and chatter. The Ancient Magus Bride is a manga series that debuted in 2013 and has been translated into an anime of the same name. While the anime adaptation is complete, Yamazaki continues to write and draw the manga. The Ancient Magus Bride story takes an orphaned Japanese high school girl and places her in the strange world of an enormous demon-like British magus who buys her at an auction. It’s a controversial series, and that controversy has only spurred Yamazaki’s popularity as a rising manga star.

Kaori Ozaki

Like many popular mangaka’s, Kaori Ozaki found her start early in life, first published at age 15 for her series An Angel Above the Piano. Today, she is best known for her series Immortal Rain which, like Fruits Basket and Chobits, found cult status in the West. Ozaki’s most recent prominent hit manga was Gods Lie, a beautiful 2016 slice-of-life manga about finding your way in life. It’s a manga that follows a young boy who feels directionless and hopeless until he meets a girl who helps open his eyes and teach him perspective.

Kazue Kato

Known for creating the hugely popular manga series Blue Exorcist, Kazue Kato was born in Shinjuku in 1980. Since rising to fame, she has received the coveted Osamu Tezuka Award for her manga Robo to Usakichi. Blue Exorcist is a rare manga that, like Full Metal Alchemist, fits into the shounen genre but is created by a woman. The series follows Rin, a son of Satan, and his journey to becoming an exorcist, to slay his father and avenge his guardian. The series, which began in 2009 and is still ongoing, is written and drawn by Kato.

Yana Toboso

Yana Toboso, born in Saitama and currently lives in Yokohama, has been making comics since 2004. Black Butler is her most well-known and appreciated piece. At the time of writing, Black Butler was on its twenty-ninth volume and had been in print since 2006. Black Butler is a gloomy manga set in Victorian London that tells a young nobleman whose parents were assassinated. When he ends up in the hands of a cult, the young lord gets into a Faustian pact with a demon who offers to assist him to discover and avenge his parent’s murderers in exchange for the demon taking the young lord’s soul.

Momoko Sakura

Momoko Sakura, sadly, is no longer with us, having died of breast cancer in 2018. She did, however, leave a lasting legacy in the shape of Chibi Maruko-chan, a long-running slice-of-life shoujo manga series. Chibi Maruko-chan is a series that was published for ten years, from the mid-80s to the mid-90s, and has been converted into animated shows and films several times, keeping its memory alive. The manga follows the titular Maruko, living in suburban Tokyo with her family and friends. For each issue, Maruko winds up in hot water and has to get herself out of it with the help of her friends.

Fumiya Sato

Winner of the Kodansha Manga Award for her series The Kindaichi Case Files, Fumiya Sato is a quiet legend of the manga world. Her successful series has been running for longer than the monolith One Piece, having begun in 1992 and continuing to this day. The Kindaichi Case Files, which, at the time of writing, has 82 volumes out, is drawn by Sato but written by two other writers: Yozaburo Kanai and Seimaru Amagi. The series follows teenage detective Hajime Kindaichi as he solves monster-of-the-week locked room mysteries and whodunnits.

Katsura Hoshino

Every emo youngster in the late 2000s was reading and watching D. Gray-Man. This manga and the anime it inspired introduced a new generation of emo girls and boys to anime and established Katsura Hoshino as a legend. Hoshino is most recognized for her gothic tone and imagery and the 19th century setting of D. Gray-Man, which chronicled the narrative of Allen Walker, a recruit in the Black Order of exorcists. The series’ antagonists are a guy known as the Millennium Earl and a reincarnation of Noah and his band of apostles from the Bible. It was a series of immense popularity around 2006-2010 and the manga continues its run to this day.

Keiko Takemiya

Keiko Takemiya is another founding member of The 24 Group, a group of female manga artists that took over shoujo manga from male artists and established themselves as the genre’s stars. Takemiya is most known for her works, such as Toward the Terra, The Door into Summer (Natsu e no Tobira), and The Poem of Wind and Trees (Kaze to Ki no Uta). Takemiya is well-known for popularizing shoujo manga and delving into a variety of subjects and genres ranging from lesbian romance to science fiction. Her writing and art are as varied as they are adventurous.

Hiro Fujiwara

Hiro Fujiwara is a Japanese manga artist who was born on December 23. The manga artist was previously known as Izumi Hiro and was active towards the 1990s. Still, she dropped the identity after winning the Best Rookie award in the LMS for Kaeri Michi, Yuki no Netsu. Her debut series, Kaich Wa Maid-Sama! (Maid Sama! ), was published in Hakusensha’s monthly shoujo manga magazine, LaLa. Six months after winning the Best Rookie prize in the LaLa Mangaka Scout Course, her second piece was released. It was, however, her first piece published under her present pen name, Hiro Fujiwara. Akai Yume The Crimson Colored Dream) received the Fresh Debut Award at the 36th LaLa Manga Grand Prix and was published in the November issue of LaLa DX in 2004.

Akira Akatsuki

On August 18, 1977, Akira Akatsuki was born. He used to be a Doujin Circle RIRO LAND member, writing under the pen name Kuuya. Medaka Box, for which he collaborated with Nisio Isin from 2009 to 2013, was his most noteworthy achievement. Later, the two collaborate on Shounen Shoujo, one of Oogiri’s one-shot chapters, and the manga version of Juuni Taisen. Akira Akatsuki has a very unique and recognizable style, which can be most easily seen in the way he poses his characters, his character’s proportions, his angular hands, and the distinctive way he draws eyes, as well as how he illustrates expressions.

Chica Umino

Chika Umino is the pen name of a female Japanese mangaka, designer, and artist born in Adachi, Tokyo. She received her diploma from Tokyo Metropolitan Art and Craft High School. Her pen name is derived from her favorite spot, Umi no Chikaku no Youenchi, which is also the title of her doujinshi works before her debut. She enjoys Harry Potter and Hayao Miyazaki’s animation. She refers to herself as an otaku. Umino maintained touch with Hiroshi Kamiya and Mikako Takahashi, who played Takemoto and Yamada in the anime versions of Honey and Clover, respectively.

Chūya Koyama

Chuya Koyama, one of the most well-known manga artists today, is most known for his work on Space Brothers. Since its inception in 2006, the series has spawned 34 volumes, cumulative sales of over twenty million copies, and fresh episodes that readers continue to enjoy to this day. Koyama received the two most prestigious manga prizes in Japan, the Kodansha Manga Award and the Shogakukan Manga Award, for Space Brothers. The series was converted into a live-action film, with the title song written by Coldplay, a British band. It was also made into an animated series and was televised countrywide in Japan, with ambitions to expand to over 20 additional countries. The game Space Brothers has been translated into five different languages. Recently, Koyama collaborated on a movie poster for Ridley Scott’s The Martian.

Akiko Higashimura

Akiko Higashimura (born October 15, 1975, in Kushima, Miyazaki Prefecture) is a Japanese manga artist. Fruits Komori began in the now-defunct manga magazine Bouquet Deluxe in 1999, and she subsequently garnered fame for her comic Kisekae Yuka-chan, which debuted in Cookie magazine in 2001. Higashimura was nominated for the Manga Taishō in 2008 for Himawari: Kenichi Legend, in 2009 for Mama was Tenparist, in 2010 for Princess Jellyfish, in 2011 for Omo ni Naitemasu, and in 2016 and 2017 for Tokyo Tarareba Girls. In 2010, she won the 34th Kodansha Manga Award for Best Shōjo Manga for Princess Jellyfish. In 2015, she won the 8th Manga Taishō and the Grand Prize at the 19th Japan Media Arts Festival for Blank Canvas: My So-Called Artist’s Journey.

Natsumi Aida

Natsumi Aida was born in Kanagawa on July 31, 1978. After graduating from high school in 2001, she wrote a few short tales, but it wasn’t until the pre-release of Switch Girl that she received public attention. This series provides readers with the chance to learn more about the author, mainly via the numerous tales to which it alludes. In 2005, her one-shot Virgin Complex was released in Japan, a shojo about a teenage girl determined to lose her virginity. The class was released in 2006 by Editions Delcourt. It’s a shojo set in a school setting, similar to Switch Girl. In this scene, the heroine wishes to restore order and find justice for everybody.

Atsushi Ohkubo

Atsushi Ōkubo, romanized as Atsushi Ohkubo, is a Japanese manga author and fantasy artist known for Soul Eater and Fire. Kubo’s style incorporates brilliant, colorful colors, superb line work, and abstract components to create a sense of strange surrealism in his works. Kubo’s work, often but not always featuring lanky people in odd surroundings, generates either a crowded and noisy environment with only style alone or a solo image focused on a type of absurdity in a piece.

Ken Akamatsu

He’s also known for his full espousement of the more aesthetic and loads of cute girls following the lead and enormous size of the cast. While he did do earlier doujin work, try not to be confused with his assistant MAGI – who did several doujin under the circle name of Culittle – which are sometimes confused with Ken Akamatsu. As of late, though, he seems to be breaking out of this mold, as his latest series seems to contain far less of these elements

Miki Yoshikawa

Miki Yoshikawa made her manga debut in 2003 with a one-shot titled Glory Days in Kodansha’s Magazine Special. She subsequently spent around four years as Hiro Mashima’s assistant on Rave Master (Serialized: 1999–2005) and Fairy Tail (Serialized: 2006–2017). In 2005, Miki submitted a one-shot Yankee-Kun to Megane-chan, which was then turned into a mini-series before being serialized in Kodansha’s Weekly Shonen Magazine beginning October 18, 2006. Despite having her serialization, she continued to work with Mashima-sensei for a time afterward.

Yamazaki Mari

Yamazaki Mari is a Japanese manga artist best known for her seinen comedy series Thermae Romae. She was born on April 20, 1967. She was born in Tokyo but currently resides in Chicago. In the 2010 Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prizes, she received the 3rd Manga Trish and the Short Story Award. An anime version of the manga has been made and shown, while a live-action film adaptation is being developed.

Asa Higuchi

Born on May 17, 1970, Asa Higuchi in Urawa, Saitama Prefecture is a Japanese manga artist (now part of Saitama City ). She attended Urawanishi High School in Saitama Prefecture and Hosei University’s psychology department, where she majored in sports psychology. She is currently working on Ōkiku Furikabutte, which has spanned 28 volumes to date and is being serialized in the monthly Afternoon. It won the 10th Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize for best creative work in 2006 and the 31st Kodansha Manga Award for general manga in 2007.

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